Important Dates

LEARNING GATEWAY SERIES WEBINARS — U.S. Coast Guard Museum

February 13, 2024

SAVE THE DATE: LEARNING GATEWAY SERIES WEBINARS PRESENTS:

“National Coast Guard Museum: GFWC Needs Your Support to Make It a Reality — Learn What You Can Do to Help!”

DATE: Tuesday, February 13, 2024
WHEN: 7 PM ET

WHERE: Virtual via Zoom – click here.

Did you know the U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) is the only military branch that does not have a national museum? But with GFWC’s support, we can help make the museum a reality.

Here are some facts on why your support is needed:

1) The USCG places the greatest number of women in leadership roles. In fact the highest ranking officer is Commandant, Admiral Linda Fagan, the first woman to be the highest-ranking officer in any U.S. military branch.

2) USCG Academy enrolls 43% of female cadets, which is 20% higher than the other three academies.

3) Woman have served in the USCG since the Revolutionary War as assistant lighthouse keepers in their husband’s absence. In 1830, women official started receiving assignments as lighthouse keepers.

4) During World War I, women served as uniformed clerical workers at USCG Headquarters in Washington, DC.

5) By World War II, the USCG recruited women into their women’s reserve, Semper Peritus-Always Ready (SPARS) — accounting for 12,000 women being trained at national headquarters.

6) In the 70s, the USCG emerged as a policy leader for women in the military. They were the first military branch to open its Officer Candidate School to women in 1973 and allowed women into its enlisted ranks.

7) USCG Women Leading the way:
– 1979: Lieutenant J.G. Beverly Kelly was the first female to command a U.S. military ship, Cape Newagen.

– 1991: Katherine Tiongson became the first minority female to command a ship, USCG Cutter Bainbridge Island.

For more USCG historical facts, visit: www.military.com

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